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20130207
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and conservative jews will, if i could use a very crass term, hold their part of the market. they'll decline relatively simply because of their great growth of black protestants and hispanics, some catholics, some protestants. but there aren't very big cohort moves. the people who are now moderate and liberal and black protestants are not in the surge towards fundamentalism. hard core fundamentalism, i don't think has as much future as moderate evangelicals and the pentecostals. i think that's where the future is. it's pretty hard to stay hardcore fundamentalist in america. there are so many lures out there and to build rather thick walls is frustrating. it will remain around, but i would watch much more for the exuberant groups black pentecostal, white pentecostal and moderate evangelical. [interviewer:] okay, one of the difficulties people come uwith when we talk about religious diversity and a classroom religious pluralism there's a tendency to say, "well, if you study all the religions, you water down your own religion." is there a way that a model or technique people might use, to cheri
of information, each corresponding to counting different things about the children. abstractly, in using the buttons, i've turned the children into a mathematical object, a set. and the fact that it can be a little easier to count buttons in a jar -- or count properties of a set of objects -- than it is to count kids running around the neighborhood is just the smallest of hints at the power of combinatorics. counting things, that's what combinatorics is all about. as an individual field of study, it's a relatively new one. and these days, with its strong connection to the world of computing, by providing insights into how to best organize and understand the power of the computer, it's incredibly important for modern technology. however, as cutting edge as the subject may be, its basic concerns go back to puzzles and problems from the earliest recorded evidence of mathematical thought. now, this is a facsimile of the rhind papyrus, copied around 1850 b.c. by the scribe ahmes from the now-lost text of an earlier dynasty. it was named after a scottish antiquarian, alexander henry rhind, who
the potential to carry out tests using a method that would make a nuclear weapon extremely effective. >> in the past, the nuclear bombs dropped on hiroshima and nagasaki were made of plutonium. weighed 13 tons and it resulted in a huge number of casualties. we believe the advanced weapons from the north might have several times more impact and could almost destroy an entire city. >> a new report by doctors without borders says half of the 220,000 syrian deputies in lebanon are not receiving adequate medical care. it says the situation has deteriorated over the last six months. now this live report from club anon. they were meant to be refugee camps, but are they providing any real refuge for the syrians escaping the fighting? >> the report says, basically, that the refugees are living in subhuman conditions. they don't have adequate shelter or access to medical care. we are the valid at one of the u.n. centers where the refugees come to register their names. it's a very important process. you can see them lining up. they come with their whole family and each member of the family has
students, who have joined us to go on an exploration of religion. but what a journey it is. [ music ] [male voice:] so be it. [crowd:] so be it. [male voice:] tonight - [crowd:] tonight - [dr. simons:] this is armageddon, the field of armageddon. this is definitely not your father's oldsmobile. we're at the western wall, the last remaining wall of the second temple. we're at the san francisco zen center. it was the site of illinois greatest religious drama - the exodus of the mormons. this is the spot where jesus reputedly cried for jerusalem. [ music ] [male voice:] i'm not talking about god or buddha. [ music ] [female voice:] at the end of it, what is it for? for peace. [male voice:] you just discover it within our selves. [dr. simons:] we'll go through 24 classes in which we'll meet real believers from real religious settings and then we've added two new classes, the twenty fifth and the twenty sixth class back in the setting in which we'll discuss issues such as religion and violence, very much on people's minds. religion and science - new ways that science is helping us understand spi
wish. i hope you will visit us often. mmm. you've got a deal. - hi, everybody. - aren't you supposed to be in school ? - i'm showing my grandparents where the bus stop is. - where are they going ? - to the senior citizens' center for flu shots. - that's a long bus ride. i know. my mother wanted me to go with them before school. i overslept. i don't have time. - do you think they'll be all right ? - yeah, i think so. - i'm giving them directions. - you're giving them directions ? yeah. plus, they've got a map. - nice to meet you. - hello. they don't speak much english. excuse me. i would like you to meet henry chang. you'll probably see him on his bicycle riding around making deliveries. henry, this is detective anderson. police. nice to meet you. - thanks for the coffeecake. - my pleasure. was there a problem, henry ? my grandparents are afraid of the police. why ? in china the police weren't very nice to them. from the stories i've heard, they're not so nice here either. that is not fair. not all policemen are alike. it's the way i f
that we can experience mental trouble in our life. some of the things that give us trouble, is how we're constituted. not what we have, but who we are, will influence how we feel in certain situations, and sometimes how we feel in certain situations becomes so distressed, we need help with it. and then finally, everyone knows and appreciates that you can have difficulty in life because of what's happened to you, what you've encountered. damage to the brain... the interplay of personality and environment... difficult life situations... all can contribute to mental distress. so can family history. andrew leuchter: if an individual has a first-degree relative, that is a father, mother, brother, sister, who suffers from bipolar disorder, manic depressive illness, or from depression, they are at significantly increased risk for having a mood disorder themselves. a mood disorder is an emotional state, that to some degree, interferes with social, familial, occupational functioning. the most common mood disorder throughout the world is depression. andrew leuchter: depression can strike anybod
harder? is that so? you used to say i'm pulling harder because you see the rope moving this way. that's what you used to say. remember the old days, when you didn't have that spark called what, begin with a f. - physics. - physics, all right? and now you're getting that spark, right? and now you're starting to see the world a little differently. let's try this with a couple of scale. attach this right on here. okay, now you pull that side and we can measure the force, gang, yeah? and i'll pull over here. now you look to see who pulls harder, me on helen or helen on me? and here we go. how do the readings look, gang? huh? which one is harder? how about there? how about there? and what are they, gang? ss, same same. i can't pull on you any harder than you pull on me, okay? and when i touch you-- who's touching you? am i touching her or she touching me? she's touching my hand, i felt it. from my point of view she's touching me. from her point of view i'm touching her. who's touching who? we're touching each other. thank you, helen. my thumb, my forefinger, they're pulling on each other.
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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